Thursday, May 01, 2008

TALK ABOUT TERROR- NICKY HAGER and JANE KELSEY


A public forum with NICKY HAGER and JANE KELSEY
Part Three of the TALK ABOUT TERROR series
brings together two of New Zealand's prominent experts on issues of surveillance and decolonisation to discuss the implications of this new terrorism legislation.

Whare Wananga, Second Floor,
Auckland Central Library, Lorne Street
Wednesday 7 May, 6pm – 7:30pm

The terrorist attacks on the US of September 11, 2001 have had a profound effect on the way nation states protect their territories. In the United Kingdom and the United States, we have seen the introduction of an increased level of surveillance on everyday citizens, ranging from CCTV to the recording of private conversations. Here in New Zealand, we have seen the introduction of the Terrorism Suppression Act 2002, which grants the Government additional powers in its ability to surveil, search and detain those suspected of terrorist acts. While designed to protect citizens, the arrest of a number of environmental and Maori activists in the so-called "terror raids" since October last year have raised widespread debate on the use and limits of surveillance.

In this third session of the Talk About Terror series, we are joined by independent investigative journalist NICKY HAGER and Professor of Law JANE KELSEY to talk about the topic of
civil surveillance.

NICKY HAGER brings an intimate knowledge of the organisation of intelligence networks in New
Zealand. The author of four books, including Secret Power: New Zealand's role in the international spy network (1996) and The Hollow Men: A study in the politics of deception (2006), Hagar is widely considered to be one of New Zealand's leading investigative journalists.

Professor JANE KELSEY is an internationally renowned expert on globalisation, economics, social policy and decolonisation. The author of six books, including The New Zealand Experiment. A World Model for Structural Adjustment? (1995) and Reclaiming the Future. New Zealand in the Global Economy (2000), Kelsey travels extensively as a consultant, keynote presenter and accredited journalist.

THIS LECTURE IS PART OF THE TALK ABOUT TERROR SERIES ORGANISED BY NOVA PAUL, GERALDENE PETERS AND PHOEBE FLETCHER.

Supported By:
SCHOOL OF ART AND DESIGN, AUT University
SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION STUDIES, AUT University
DEPARTMENT OF FILM, TELEVISION AND MEDIA STUDIES, University of Auckland
THE PACIFIC MEDIA CENTRE (Te Amokura), AUT University

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